Tag Archives: remaking moby

The Symphony: a remaking

Here is another of my MoMoby Productions videos for the Remaking Moby-Dick Project  for “Chapter 132: The Symphony”  in Moby-Dick. It is sung by Astrid Selling  and Kristin Borgehed, from Folk Practice Academy in Ronneby, Sweden. I have been working with both of them for another research project based on Baltic stories, and they seemed like the perfect “chorus” to reimagine the music of the sea drawn from the women who wait for others to return, or who just celebrate their own togetherness.

The images come from a tapestry I documented and remixed at the Herring Era Museum in Siglufjörður, Iceland for another project when I visited there during a research residency in February 2013. The tapestry depicts Icelandic “herring girls” hard at work in brutal manual labor (artistically rendered and contrasted in much softer handicraft form, which I loved) combined with depictions of them in “stillness,” backs turned to us, waiting for the ships to come in. Do they wait for fish, men, or just more money to keep them financially independent? They keep their secrets.

 

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#mixitupfest news

artline_digfest_posterAs a researcher in Digital Culture with a particular interest in mixed reality (MR) performance, that is the integration of physical and mediated spaces that engage/support/create active and dynamic sites and interfaces between them, I am very pleased to be organizing a festival in May 2013 to explore the theme in more depth. The Mixing Realities Digital Performance Festival (or#MIXITUPFEST) is a result of my involvement in the Digital Art Platform Initiative in Art Line which intends to research innovation in art and media, with a particular focus (for me) on emergent media forms and types with performative dimensions. Interactive installations, hybrid live and mediated performances, augmented reality (AR) tools and experiences, as well as  social and  locative media are just some of the ways in which one can study the increasingly (e)merged contexts within contemporary media culture. As media types and forms entangle within emerging media outlets, “lived” human experiences, and other phenomena, understanding the boundaries and aesthetics and expressive properties of these  assemblages and formulations is critical. Our festival will explore some of these questions in practical and theoretical ways though a one-day seminar and workshop on AR/MR, interactive installations, hybrid live and media performances, a collaborative reading of Melville’s Moby Dick (The Moby Reading Marathon) held live and online with participants from around the world, and demonstrations and discussions of locative, social, and media interventions in public spaces. A public screening of the Remaking Moby-Dick Project video will also be included at the Blekinge Museum for the festival. More about the festival is available on the Art Line website, as well as on the ReMaking Moby and Moby Marathon Reading blogs. I’m honoured and excited to be coordinating this exciting line-up of artists and researchers, and also happy to showcase some of my own recent projects. #MIXITUPFEST ftw!

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Remaking Moby-Dick: A multimodal storytelling adventure that needs you!

In the spirit of all things Moby, I am working on yet another Moby-themed project. This is the Remaking Moby-Dick Project, an International multimodal digital storytelling event that will be screened at the Mixing Realities Digital Performance Festival in May 2013 in Kalrkskrona, Sweden, but also published and recirculated in other forms. I am working with curator Trish Bodiford Harris to coordinate this project, and we are currently seeking submissions and participants. You can read more about the project on our Remaking Moby-Dick blog. Come aboard and join the fun. We need you. Moby needs you.

*Update: In May 2013, the Remaking Moby-Dick Project YouTube version was screened at the “Mixing Realities Digital Performance Festival” in Karlksrona at the Blekinge Museum and in late 2013, the print version of Remaking Moby-Dick was published. Wahoo! It’s a wonderful collection of more print-centric creative reflections on the text, but also includes QR code links to select video components. (A more current blog post about the publication is also available with links to access the texts.)

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